Monday, December 19, 2011

Family Secrets..... Things not talked about.....

An inspiring account of America at its worst-and Americans at their best-woven from the stories of Depression-era families who were helped by gifts from the author’s generous and secretive grandfather





 In A Secret Gift, he weaves these revelations seamlessly into a tapestry of Depression-era America, which will fascinate and inspire in equal measure.

Monday, December 12, 2011

I have a Flight Attendant in my family !!!


 The two muchkins below don't really count... just cute....  But I will have to write in the life story of Kandy Kirk, Tony Kirk and the mother of the pink munchkin... Lawry Kirk Shabazz !!



Thursday, December 1, 2011


Week 48. Thanksgiving

Week 48. Thanksgiving. 


What was on your family’s Thanksgiving table? Do you serve the same dishes now as your family served in the past? This challenge runs from Saturday, November 26, 2011 through Friday, December 2, 2011

Fall Week 47


Week 47. Fall. 

What was fall like where and when you grew up? Describe not only the climate, but how the season influenced your activities, food choices, etc. This challenge runs from Saturday, November 19, 2011 through Friday, November 25, 2011

I'm counting down to 52 week December 2011




Madison Street COGIC...headed to Sunday services this fall of 2011!!!

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Week #46 – Politics Week

 Politics. What are your childhood memories of politics? Were your parents active in politics? What political events and elections do you remember from your youth? This challenge runs from Saturday, November 12, 2011 through Friday, November 18, 2011. 


Countdown to Election Day 2011: 5 days
Countdown to Iowa caucuses: 61 days    ***  January 3 caucus in Iowa
Countdown to South Carolina primary: 79 days
Countdown to Florida primary: 89 days
Countdown to Nevada caucuses: 93 days
Countdown to Super Tuesday: 124 days




As usual, Mitt Romney, simply by standing there, looking presidential, and not making a fool of himself. He has to be the luckiest man on earth. Dozens, if not hundreds of polls have shown month after month that three-quarters of the Republican voters do not want him as their nominee. Yet every challenger who rises up to take the mantle of the Not-Romney implodes due to personal flaws. Donald Trump got lost in Birtherland somewhere. Michele Bachmann is crazy as a loon, Perry can't remember why he wants to be President,


“Earlier today Herman Cain rejected calls that he should withdraw from the race. He said, ‘It ain’t gonna happen!’ That’s what he said. Ironically, that’s what women say to him when he’d put his hand up their skirt.” –Jay Leno



and Cain has a Bill-Clinton-type problem (but without the charm that saved Clinton over and over).
                                    So who's left? Santorum has a Google problem and Ron Paul is way out of the mainstream.  Of  late there has been a boomlet for Newt Gingrich, but he comes with a lot of baggage. In particular, marrying his high school math teacher seems a bit odd, but is otherwise not a problem. The trouble is that he served divorce papers on her when she was in the hospital with cancer. Anyone can make a mistake after all. But then he got married to wife #2 during which period of marital bliss he led the attack on Bill Clinton for his dalliance with Monica Lewinsky. The problem here is that while attacking Clinton for cheating on his wife, Gingrich was cheating on wife #2 with a woman who would later become wife #3. Clearly Gingrich loves women and would never harass them, but if he rises to the top after Cain's fall, all this history is going to resurface. People are going to say: "We dumped Cain for WHAT?"
                                       The strangest thing about the whole campaign so far is that there actually is a candidate who is as good as Romney but without the flip-flopping problem that so plagues Romney: Jon Huntsman. He was a successful and popular governor, speaks fluent Chinese, and as ambassador to China is the only one of the Republican candidates with any foreign policy experience at all. But in the polls, he is lucky to register in the single digits so everyone ignores him. His problem is that the modern Republican Party has moved so far to the right that Huntsman, who governed pragmatically--much as Ronald Reagan did--now looks like a far leftist. His sins in the eyes of the Republican electorate are twofold: he worked for Obama as ambassador to China and he doesn't throw raw meat to the base on every issue. He could have deflected the first point by using John McCain's campaign slogan "Country First" saying he was called on to serve his country and he did not shirk his duty. He could try to blunt the second point by saying he can win the votes of the almighty independent voters. And he could certainly hammer Romney on his flip flopping, something Huntsman has never done. But the media, which once had a crush on him, has dropped him like a hot potato.
                                           So every day it looks more and more like Obama vs. Romney in Nov. 2012.




 Unless the voters of four small quirky states thrown sand in the gears of Romney's well-oiled machine.

Week #45 – High School

Week 45. High School. Describe your middle and/or high school. Was it a large or small student body? Is the school still in existence today? How has it changed since you went there? This challenge runs from Saturday, November 5, 2011 through Friday, November 11, 2011

Books to Own and Read.....


Franklin, Jimmie Lewis. The Blacks in Oklahoma : Newcomers to a New Land. Norman: U. Oklahoma Press, 1980.
—. Journey toward Hope: A History of Blacks in Oklahoma. Norman: U. Oklahoma Press, 1982.

Allen Toles' African American One-Room Schoolhouse | TravelOK.com - Oklahoma's Official Travel & Tourism Site

Allen Toles' African American One-Room Schoolhouse TravelOK.com - Oklahoma's Official Travel & Tourism Site



Loretta Y. Jackson     P.O. Box 2044  Chickasha, Oklahoma 73023   ©The Loretta Y. Jackson African American Historical Society  
315 E Ada Sipuel Ave, Chickasha, OK 73018   Phone: 405-224-5297 405-224-1953   Fax: 405-224-1935

The LYJ-AAHS Project consists of a museum site with two buildings. The first building is an early 20th Century, one room African American school and has been relocated to the museum site and has been restored. The second building will be a 2050 sq. ft spacious gallery and meeting-listening room. The museum and history center site will be located on Ada Lois Sipuel Avenue. This street was named in honor of Ada Lois Sipuel who, in 1946, filed a lawsuit because she was denied admission to the University of Oklahoma School of Law. After the Supreme Court's favorable decision, Sipuel, the first African American was admitted.



Purpose: The LYJ-AAHS Project will create a museum and history center that will be dedicated to the collection and exhibition of items pertaining to the heritage and culture of African Americans through the relocation and restoration of an early 20th Century one room school and by providing a Gallery of exhibits and various artifacts. This is to encourage the study and appreciation of the contributions of African Americans.

OU Honors / Inductee Ada Sipuel Fisher


Video.....it’s now posted on the OU Law website homepage.






 Ada's Great Gramd-daughter Christiana Factory.... graduating Sr 2011
And her cool great-grandson.... Khalil Factory!!! 
Love my Family!!!



 Many times, I am remembering the accomplishments of 1948 on behalf of my own granddaughter.... as she will (Lord Willing...) .... she will live to witness 2048... 100 years of history!

Great-niece.... Anayah Shabazz

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Genealogy Term: Daughter's Out


Daughtering Out
Q: I was reading an article and the author mentioned that a line "daughtered out." What does this term mean? -- Louise
A: When a line has only daughters, the line "daughter's out." This does not mean that you cannot claim descent. You descend just as directly from a daughter as you do from a son. The big difference when you descend from a daughter is that usually the surname will change.
When a daughter marries she generally takes the surname of her spouse. What this means is that those that descend from her no longer have the surname of the famous individual. And if she had only daughters, then there would be yet another surname thrown into the picture.
For instance, General William Tecumseh SHERMAN was born 8 Feb 1820 in Lancaster, Ohio. Depending on which side of the Mason-Dixon line you might be on, you may consider him a famous ancestor or a skeleton in your closet if you are basing it on his performance during the American Civil War. However, you cannot have the SHERMAN surname and be directly descended from him. While he had four sons, none of them had offspring. Two of his sons, William and Charles both died young. His son Tom became a Catholic priest. Other son Philemon never married and had apparently no issue. His descent is one of those that daughter's out.

Monday, October 31, 2011


Week 44. Elementary School. Describe your grammar/elementary school (or schools). Were they big or small? Are any of these schools still in existence today? If so, how have they changed since you went there? This challenge runs from Saturday, October 29, 2011 through Friday, Novemebr 4, 2011.

52 Week challenge 2011  
http://www.geneabloggers.com/tag/52-weeks-of-personal-genealogy-history/

Week 43. Worst School Subject. What was your worst or least favorite subject in school and why? This challenge runs from Saturday, October 22, 2011 through Friday, October 28, 2011.
Week 42. Favorite School Subject. What was your favorite subject in school and why? Was it also your best subject? This challenge runs from Saturday, October 15, 2011 through Friday, October 21, 2011.
Teachers Week 41. Teachers. Did you have a favorite teacher when you were growing up? What class(es) did this person teach and why did he/she make an impact on your life? This challenge runs from Saturday, October 8, 2011 through Friday, October 14, 2011.  

52 Weeks of Genealogy 2011

Week 40: Trouble. What happened when you got into trouble as a child? What was punishment like in your home? This challenge runs from Saturday, October 1, 2011 through Friday, October 7, 2011.







Week 39: Least Favorite Foods. What was your least favorite food from your childhood? Did your parents make you eat it anyway? Do you still dislike the same food today? How have your tastes changed since your youth?

Monday, October 24, 2011

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Collectibles: Postcard of Ada Sipuel Fisher


Tips on Family Health History


Tips on collecting 

your family health history

Talk it up…
  • Talk to a relative with whom you feel comfortable – find out what they know about aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents. 
  • You can also collect health information on close family members by talking at family gatherings.
Write it down...
  • Write down health problems that you and your family members have had and the age the problems began.
  • If someone has died, write down why they died and their age of death.
Pass it on…
  • Share this information with other family members and with your doctor.

Knowing your family health history can save your life

Many families have a history of health conditions such as cancer, diabetes, or heart disease.  If there is a history of a particular condition in your family, you may be at greater risk of developing the condition.
The Virginia Department of Health has developed the Family Health History Form to make it easy for you to collect and record your family’s health information.   Simply download the form, print it out, and fill in the information.  We encourage families to complete a Family Health History on each family member and to share the information with their family physician

Week #38 – Hobbies Week 38: Hobbies. Did you have any hobbies as a child? Which ones? This challenge runs from Saturday, September 17, 2011 through Friday, September 23, 2011
Week #37 – Earliest Memory Week 37: Earliest Memory. What is your earliest memory? This challenge runs from Saturday, September 10, 2011 through Friday, September 16, 2011
Week #36 – Road Trips Week 36: Road Trips. Describe a family road trip from your childhood. Where did you go and why? Who was in the car? How did you pass the time? This challenge runs from Saturday, September 3, 2011 through Friday, September 9, 2011
Week 35: Weddings. Tell us about your wedding. You may also talk about your future wedding, the wedding of a relative or shape this question to fit your own life experience. This challenge runs from Saturday, August 27, 2011 through Friday, September 2, 2011

Smells Week 34

Smells. Describe any smells that take you back to childhood. These could be from meals, fragrant gardens, musty basements, or something entirely different. This challenge runs from Saturday, August 20, 2011 

Nicknames Week 33

Nicknames. What was your childhood nickname, and what was the meaning behind it? You can also discuss the nicknames of other family members, both past and present. This challenge runs from Saturday, August 13, 2011





Tombstone Tuesday

Geneabloggers Weekly questions 2011



Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Important Links for My Family Search

I came back across the Family Search along with my bkquiltin@yahoo.com login and password.   I'll keep this here on my blog postings...User Name: 5700kelley    Password: patches7128





Social Security Death Index

SSDI  is also linked here.    Now am I happy or what !! ??







Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Week #32 – Dinner Time Week 32: Dinner Time. On a typical childhood evening, who was around the dinner table? Was the meal served by one person, or was it a free-for-all? What is dinner time like in your family today? This challenge runs from Saturday, August 6, 2011 through Friday, 

Week 33: Nicknames. What was your childhood nickname, and what was the meaning behind it? You can also discuss the nicknames of other family members, both past and present. This challenge runs from Saturday, August 13, 2011 through Friday, August 19, 2011. 

Week #34 – Smells Week 34: Smells. Describe any smells that take you back to childhood. These could be from meals, fragrant gardens, musty basements, or something entirely different. This challenge runs from Saturday, August 20, 2011 through Friday, August 26, 2011.
Week #35 – Wedding Week 35: Weddings. Tell us about your wedding. You may also talk about your future wedding, the wedding of a relative or shape this question to fit your own life experience. This challenge runs from Saturday, August 27, 2011 through Friday, September 2, 2011

Week #36 – Road Trips Week 36: Road Trips. Describe a family road trip from your childhood. Where did you go and why? Who was in the car? How did you pass the time? This challenge runs from Saturday, September 3, 2011 through Friday, September 9, 2011.

Week #37 – Earliest Memory Week 37: Earliest Memory. What is your earliest memory? This challenge runs from Saturday, September 10, 2011 through Friday, September 16, 2011. 
Week #38 – Hobbies Week 38: Hobbies. Did you have any hobbies as a child? Which ones? This challenge runs from Saturday, September 17, 2011 through Friday, September 23, 2011.

Week #39 – Least Favorite Foods Week 39: Least Favorite Foods. What was your least favorite food from your childhood? Did your parents make you eat it anyway? Do you still dislike the same food today? How have your tastes changed since your youth? This challenge runs from Saturday, September 24, 2011 through Friday, September

Monday, September 19, 2011

What is Genealogy.... ???


"The word genealogy comes from two Greek words, one meaning ‘race’ or ‘family,’ the other ‘theory’ or ‘science.’ Therefore, genealogy is the science of tracing your ancestry. Family history, stories about your ancestors, can help you research your genealogy, and your genealogy proves your family history."
-- Willard, Jim & Terry. Ancestors. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1997:5. [929.1 W69AN] 

Tuesday, August 30, 2011


Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, love leaves a memory no one can steal.
 ~From a headstone in Ireland

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Slaves & Free People of Color - 1800 - 1860

http://youtu.be/ukS_SyzTJ3k


SAt the August 11 Thursday night Archives and History genealogy program in the library, Greg Carroll made a presentation on slaves and free people of color in western Virginia. Carroll noted some of the materials available for research on African Americans in West Virginia but indicated a need to collect more information, such as oral histories.


Slaves & Free People of Color in Western Virginia by Greg Carroll

Camp Douglas, IL


Illinois Prisoner of War Camps

Prisoner Exchange

At the start of the Civil War, a formal exchange system for prisoners of war was not arranged because President Lincoln did not recognize the Confederacy as having wartime rights. However, after the defeat of Union forces at 1st Manassas/ Bull Run, with a large number of Union prisoners held by the Confederacy, the U.S. Congress requested that Lincoln take measures to effect an exchange. Up to this time opposing commanders sometimes would arrange an exchange of their prisoners under a flag of truce, but these transactions were few.
The first government-sanctioned exchanges took place in February 1862, but it was not until July 22 that a formal cartel detailing the exchange system was agreed to by the two governments. Under this agreement, all prisoners were to be released- either exchanged or paroled- within 10 days of capture. An equivalency table was devised in which a certain number of enlisted men could be exchanged for an officer. Excess prisoners who could not be exchanged were to be released on parole, which meant they could not perform any military service until they were officially notified that they had been exchanged.
The system was bogged down by paperwork, and each side found reason to interrupt exchanges from time to time, but the cartel operated reasonably well until it broke down in the summer of 1863. By that time the federal government had begun to use black soldiers in its war effort. Refusing to recognize black soldiers as prisoners of war, the Confederacy reduced them to slave status and threatened to execute as insurrectionists the Union officers who had commanded them. A retaliatory threat by the Union prevented the Confederacy from carrying out any executions but did not restore the cartel. Several times later in the war, the Southern states needed soldiers and requested the exchanges resume, but Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, with plenty of Union soldiers, refused.
Both sides agreed to a prisoner exchange arrangement which operated during the latter half of 1862. Under the cartel, captives remaining after the exchanges were paroled. But the agreement broke down, in part because of Northern refusal to recognize the Confederate authorities as anything other than "rebels," and in part over the Negro question.
Following the promulgation of the Emancipation Proclamation on New Year's Day, 1863, the North began enlisting former slaves into the Federal army. Confederate President Jefferson Davis declared that "all Negro slaves captured in arms" and their White officers should be delivered over to the South to be dealt with according to law. That could mean rigorous prosecution under strict laws relating to Negro insurrections.
Still, special exchanges on a reduced scale continued, but from 1863 onwards, both sides were holding large numbers of prisoners.
On 17 April 1864, General Grant ordered that no more Confederate prisoners were to be paroled or exchanged until there were released a sufficient number of Union officers and men to equal the parolees at Vicksburg and Port Hudson and unless the Confederate authorities would agree to make no distinction whatsoever between White and Negro prisoners.
On 10 August, the Confederate government offered to exchange officer for officer and man for man, accompanying the proposal with a statement on conditions at Andersonville. This offer induced General Grant to reveal his real reason for refusing any further exchanges. "Every man we hold, when released on parole or otherwise," Grant reported to Washington, "becomes an active soldier against us at once either directly or indirectly. If we commence a system of exchange which liberates all prisoners taken, we will have to fight on until the whole South is exterminated. If we hold those caught they amount to no more than dead men. At this particular time to release all rebel prisoners North would insure Sherman's defeat and would compromise our safety here." (Rhodes, pp499-500)
In October, Lee proposed to Grant another man-to-man exchange of prisoners. Grant asked whether Lee would turn over Negro troops "the same as White soldiers?" When Lee declared that "Negroes belonging to our citizens are not considered subjects of exchange," the negotiations completely broke down.
After the cessation of prisoner exchanges under the cartel, the camps of the South became crowded and the growing poverty of the Confederacy resulted in excessive suffering in the Southern stockades. Reports about these conditions in the Northern press created the belief that the ill treatment was part of a deliberate policy. The inevitable war hatred made such a belief readily credible.
After the war, Confederate partisans laid responsibility for camp conditions (on both sides) at the feet of the Federal authorities. They pointed to the Northern cancellation of the parole and exchange cartel which put a heavy and unexpected strain on the Southern prisoner program. They also condemned the North for its deliberate cut in rations for Confederate prisoners as a reaction to reports of bad conditions in the Southern camps.

Prisoners were exchanged on the following basis

  • 1 general = 46 privates
  • 1 major general = 40 privates
  • 1 brigadier general = 20 privates
  • 1 colonel = 15 privates
  • 1 lieutenant colonel = 10 privates
  • 1 major = 8 privates
  • 1 captain = 6 privates
  • 1 lieutenant = 4 privates
  • 1 noncommissioned officer = 2 privates

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Chickadee & Beverly... It Rhymes!.


Slavery and Emancipation in the Nation's Capital


Damani Davis shows how to use federal records to explore the lives of African American ancestors from Washington, DC.

Find out more in

Slavery and Emancipation in the Nation's Capital: Using Federal Records to Explore the Lives of African American Ancestors


On October 6, 1862, in the nation's capital, two families appeared before a federally appointed board of commissioners that administered all business relating to the April 16 Emancipation Act that abolished slavery in the District of Columbia.1 Alice Addison, the head of a formerly enslaved African American family, was accompanied by her two adult daughters, Rachel and Mary Ann, along with Mary Ann's three children, George, Alice, and James. The other family, their former white owners, was headed by Teresa Soffell, a widow. Her three sons, Richard, John, and James, and her two daughters, Mary and Ann Young, accompanied her. A mutual desire to officially register the Addison family's new status as freed persons prompted their joint appearance. The Soffells hoped to gain the financial compensation promised by Congress to all former slaveholders in the District who had remained loyal to the Union; the Addisons simply desired the comfort and security of having an official record certifying their freedom.

The Soffells had missed the July 15, 1862, compensation deadline mandated under the terms of the April 16 act.2 The Soffells explained to the commissioners that they failed to petition by the deadline because the Addisons were no longer residing on their property at the time the act went into effect.3 The Addisons had fled the city three days earlier on April 13, fearing that President Abraham Lincoln and the federal government planned to forcibly deport them—along with all other ex-slaves—to Africa. The report noted that the Addisons had fled to their father's residence (the father of the two adult daughters) who lived in Montgomery County, Maryland, and was a slave owned by a Harry Cook. The Addisons remained there until September 28, 1862, when they returned to Washington, D.C.4


This glimpse into the lives of two Washington area families—former slaves and slaveholders—is preserved in federal records that relate to slavery and emancipation in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia before and during the Civil War era. These records contain personal information such as names, ages, physical descriptions, and places of residence, as well as collateral information casually provided in recorded testimonies. As shown in the Addison family's case, information concerning the daughter's enslaved father—including details concerning his residence in Montgomery County and the full name of his owner—is found in their testimony explaining their flight.

Slavery existed in the nation's capital from the very beginning of the city's history in 1790, when Congress created the federal territory from lands formerly held by the slave states of Virginia and Maryland. Because of its advantageous location between these two states, Washington became a center of the domestic slave trade in the 19th century and was home of one of the most active slave depots in the nation. The rapid expansion of cotton as the primary cash crop for states throughout the Deep South generated a renewed demand for slave labor. Planters and slave dealers in the declining tobacco-centered Chesapeake region of Maryland and Virginia, sought to capitalize on this demand by selling their surplus labor in a burgeoning domestic slave market. As one historian notes, "Washington offered dealers a convenient transportation nexus between the Upper and Lower South, as the city connected to southern markets via waterways, overland roads, and later rail."5

Within the District of Columbia, slave dealers housed the slaves in crowded pens and prisons as they waited to sell them. "Slave-coffles," long lines of shackled blacks marching from one site to another, gradually generated controversy throughout the nation. As Washington became the focus of abolitionism in the decades before the Civil War, antislavery activists argued that such scenes in the nation's capital disgraced the nation as a whole and its ideals. The Compromise of 1850 abolished active slave trading within the boundaries of the District, but the trade continued to flourish in Maryland and Virginia. As tensions increased nationally in the years leading up to the Civil War, slavery in the nation's capital continued to be a subject of special focus, activism, and compromise.6

The numbers of slaves gradually declined in the District throughout the early 19th century—from approximately 6,400 slaves in 1820 to 3,100 by 1860. Throughout the 1800s, many owners voluntarily manumitted their slaves. Of the city's black population in 1800, those who were enslaved outnumbered those who were free by four to one; however, by 1860 the number of free blacks actually exceeded the number of slaves by three to one.

In the years leading up to D.C. emancipation, the typical slave in Washington worked in some form of domestic service, and female slaves outnumbered males. On the surface, the nature of the institution seemed relatively benign compared to the harsher forms of plantation slavery in parts of the rural South, and most blacks in the District were free. Despite appearances, all African Americans in Washington—both enslaved and free—lived in a state of constant vulnerability. Those who were enslaved feared being sold further south and separated from family and loved ones. Free blacks were required to always have on their person a copy of their "certificate of freedom," and the burden of proving their status was on them. Without proof of status, free blacks could be jailed at anytime. Even if they subsequently proved their status, detained blacks still were responsible for paying for the cost of their stay. If they failed to prove their free status in sufficient time, they risked being sold further south into slavery.


Slavery remained legal in the District until April 16, 1862, when President Abraham Lincoln signed into law an act abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia (12 Stat. 376). The D.C. Emancipation Act originally provided for immediate emancipation, compensation to loyal Unionist masters of up to $300 for each slave, and voluntary colonization of former slaves outside the United States. The act required owners claiming compensation to file schedules listing and describing each slave by July 15, 1862. A supplementary act of July 12, 1862 (12 Stat. 538) permitted the submission of schedules by slaves whose owners lived outside of the District of Columbia if the slave had been employed with the owner's consent in the District any time after April 16, 1862. The emancipation records consist of the schedules and supporting documentation submitted as a result of these two acts.
The records are organized generally by the last name of slave owner (act of April 16, 1862) or by the last name of slave (act of July 12, 1862). Several series of records relating to slavery and emancipation in the District of Columbia have been published on microfilm and reproduced on research web sites such as Ancestry.com and Footnote.com. Records of the Board of Commissioners for the Emancipation of Slaves in the District of Columbia, 1862–1863 (National Archives Microfilm Publication M520) relates directly to the management and dispensation of the emancipation acts of April 16 and July 12, 1862. Records of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Relating to Slaves, 1851–1863 (M433), and Habeas Corpus Case Records, 1820–1863, of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia (M434), contain records relevant to the broader history and social presence of slavery in the District of Columbia.7



Emancipation Papers, Manumission Papers, Affidavits of Freedom, and Case Papers Relating to Fugitive Slave, 1851–1863

The records of the U.S. Circuit Court for the District of Columbia (in Record Group 21) contain the bulk of documents relating to both free blacks and enslaved blacks who resided in Washington, D.C., and surrounding counties during the antebellum and Civil War eras. The circuit court records include:
  • Manumission papers for blacks who were voluntarily freed by their owners during the decade before the 1862 act
  • Emancipation papers for those freed as a result of the 1862 act
  • Affidavits or certificates of freedom (the official records of proof certifying the status of free blacks)
These files reveal information about free and enslaved individuals from a variety of backgrounds who were part of the everyday life and culture of the region.


Alfred Pope, a notable figure in Washington's African American history, was originally owned by South Carolina congressman Col. John Carter. Pope first appeared in public records as a participant in "The Pearl Affair." In April 1848, 77 slaves—including 38 men and boys, 26 women and girls, and 13 small children or infants—embarked on a schooner, the Pearl, and sailed up the Potomac with hopes of making it to the North. A militia on a steamboat overtook the Pearl at the mouth of the Chesapeake. The majority of the slaves' owners sold the captured fugitives to states in the Deep South; a few, Pope among them, escaped that fate. Later as a free man, Pope became a highly successful businessman, a landowner, a community leader in Georgetown, and a leading member of the black community in Washington.11
Pope's file contains a letter written by a white witness, John Marbury, the executor of his deceased owner's will. Pope submitted the letter to the circuit court to confirm that he was indeed free and to explain how he had lost earlier documents proving his freedom.
The bearer, Alfred Pope, a coloured man, who will hand you this note was a servant of the late Colonel Jno Carter of this town. . . . By Colonel Carters will Alfred was set free, & is now, with my consent as Executor, in the enjoyments of his freedom. . . . Alfred caused this necessary certificate of his freedom to be entered on record in your office & had in his possession a certified copy. About a week since . . . his dwelling house . . . took fire in the night & was destroyed with all his furniture. . . . Alfred wishes to leave the District in search of employment and wants to obtain a copy from the record of the evidence of his being a freed man. I would accompany him to your office to offer in person my testimony to the aforegoing facts but I am very unwell & unable to do so—will you be so kind as to render him the service he needs, by giving him the renewed evidence of his freedom in the proper form? very respectfully, Jno Marbury.12
As part of the Compromise of 1850, the act of September 18, 1850 (9 Stat. 462) provided that claimants to fugitive slaves could recover their slaves, either by applying to federal judges and commissioners for warrants to arrest the fugitives or by arresting the slaves and taking them before the judges or commissioners to establish ownership. The fugitive slave case records are organized by date and contain warrants for arrest and documentation of proof of ownership.
The file of Mary Ann Williams, a fugitive and accused runaway, contains the warrant for her arrest.
Whereas Mary Massey of . . . Alexandria, State of Virginia hath applied to the Circuit Court for the rendition to her of a certain black negro woman named Mary Ann Williams . . . You are hereby commanded forth with . . . to arrest her . . . she being found in your bailiwick, and her safety keep, so that you have her body before the Circuit Court of the District of Columbia, . . . immediately.
Upon the capture of Mary Ann Williams, she was delivered back to her owner, Mary Massey:
the said Mary Ann Williams being brought into Court by the Marshal on a warrant issued by the Court in these premises, her identity having been proved by Rudolph Massey—it is thus . . . ordered . . . that the Marshal . . . deliver her[e] the said Mary Ann Williams to the said Mary Massey; and . . . Mary Massey is authorized . . . to transport the said Mary Ann Williams to the State of Virginia from where she escaped.
For those fugitives who successfully eluded capture, there would be no record other than the initial warrant for arrest.13





Library of Congress

I'm always taking a sideways glance via google... to find a picture of Capn James A Anderson....

http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/sets/72157625520211184/

The Library of Congress has acquired a rare collection of nearly 700 Civil War-era photographs. The collection includes photographs of Union and Confederate soldiers, as well as the women and children they left behind. The collection is available on Flickr, which facilitates the help of viewers in assisting in identifying individuals and objects

These fascinating photographs represent the impact of the war, which involved many young enlisted men and the deaths of more than 600,000 soldiers. The photos feature details that enhance their interest, including horses, drums, muskets, rifles, revolvers, hats and caps, canteens, and a guitar. Among the rarest images are African Americans in uniform, sailors, a Lincoln campaign button, and portraits with families, women, and girls and boys

http://www.besthistorysites.net/USHistory_CivilWar.shtml
Best of History Web Site

Friday, August 19, 2011

Chickadee & Beverly... It Rhymes!.

My folks... my momma....used to call me a little chickadee...............

The Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) is a small, North American songbird, a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. It is the state bird of both Maine and Massachusetts in the United States, and the provincial bird of New Brunswick in Canada. It is notable for its capacity to lower its body temperature during cold winter nights, its good spatial memory to relocate the caches where it stores food, and its boldness near humans (they can feed from the hand).


Week #33 Nicknames

Week #33 – Nicknames What was your childhood nickname, and what was the meaning behind it? You can also discuss the nicknames of other family members, both past and present. This challenge runs from Saturday, August 13, 2011 through Friday, August 19, 2011. 



"COOKIE"
JoAnn Kirk Adams

Thursday, August 18, 2011




We thank you Lord for the gift of life.

Help us to appreciate the unique dignity of every person and the individual contribution they make tothe world, in fulfilment of the task you give them.  Enable us by your grace to promote their well-being, serving you in one another in a spirit of generosity,through Christ Jesus Our Lord.   Amen.


From a Fellow Blogger.....
http://rosa-munda.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2011-07-31T12%3A44%3A00%2B01%3A00&max-results=10

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Leona Mitchell Southern Heights Heritage Center & Museum | TravelOK.com - Oklahoma's Official Travel & Tourism Site

Leona Mitchell Southern Heights Heritage Center & Museum | TravelOK.com - Oklahoma's Official Travel & Tourism Site


616 Leona Mitchell Blvd
Enid, OK 73701
Phone: 580-237-6989  580-402-2524

Directions
From Oklahoma City, take I-35 north to Hwy 412 W to Leona Mitchell Place; turn left. From Hwy 81 N, drive to Owen K. Garriott and turn right onto Leona Mitchell Place. Turn right.

One of Enid's best kept secrets, this museum is named in honor of Leona Mitchell, a black Chickasaw benefactor, international opera singer and Enid resident.
   The museum takes great pride in presenting the story of ethnic Native Americans, black Indians and Freedmen from pre-history to present day......


exhibits include collections on African Land Run pioneers, black service organization history and territorial marriages.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Monday, August 8, 2011

Week 32 - Food, food, food....

Week #32 – Dinner Time Week 32: Dinner Time. On a typical childhood evening, who was around the dinner table? Was the meal served by one person, or was it a free-for-all? What is dinner time like in your family today? 

Family records

Family time

Week 31 - Big Mama's House....

Week #31 – Grandparents’ House Week 31: Grandparents’ House. Describe your grandparents’ house. Was it big or small? How long did they live there? If you do not know this information, feel free to describe the house of another family member you remember from your childhood. 

Which Week is it...??? Jobs, jobs, jobs.....

52 Week challenge 2011  
http://www.geneabloggers.com/tag/52-weeks-of-personal-genealogy-history/

Week #30 – Employment Week 30: Employment. Describe your first job. What did you do? Were you saving for something in particular, or just trying to make a living? Did that first job provide skills and make an impact on your life today? This challenge runs from Saturday, July 23, 2011 through Friday, July 29,

Monday, August 1, 2011

Generations . . . .

Big Mama and Her Grands






My Mother and Her Grands....






Me and my Grands......

Monday, July 25, 2011

Evaporative Cooling... hmnnnn .... so much information on the Net!

.....EXAMPLE OF evaporative cooling.... It is the same physics that cools your cup of hot coffee. In your coffee, the most energetic coffee molecules escape from the cup and come off as steam.

When they do this, they take away more than their share of heat, and the atoms left behind in the cup are colder because they have lost energy.